Island City Waterways Lands in Downtown Alameda

Alameda Island City Waterways eventCelebrate the birth of our Island City with a free public art event open to all ages. On May 21 and 22, audiences will be taken on a guided journey to four sites along the water’s edge to experience art, dance, music, and tales connecting them to Alameda’s rich maritime past.

The half-mile walking route follows Alameda’s historic Waterfront Trail, starting near the foot of the Fruitvale Bridge and ending at the public walkway near the Park Street Bridge.

More than two dozen performing and visual artists will be contributing to the event. Actor Ed Holmes will share stories of immigrants drawn to the city’s booming maritime trade while the audience is surrounded by historical and present-day images of the estuary. Muralist Mark Lewis Wagner will honor the immigrants who built the tidal canal by creating large-scale drawings on sail cloth that will become a backdrop for choreography by Kim Epifano and music by Maze Daiko.

Alameda Island City Waterways TrailTour times on Saturday, May 21 and Sunday, May 22 are 10:30am-Noon, 12:30pm-2:00pm, and 2:30pm-4:00pm. Participation on each tour is limited to 100 people, with 50 spots per tour available for advance reservation. Plan to arrive 30 minutes early to park and register.

The event is conceived and directed by Rhythmix Cultural Works Founder and Artistic Director Janet Koike.

Reservations and info: www.islandcitywaterways.org

 

Learn more about Alameda’s maritime history at these downtown locations:

Rhythmix Cultural Works AlamedaRhythmix Cultural Works, K Gallery (2513 Blanding Ave)
In conjunction with Island City Waterways, Rhythmix Cultural Works presents “Island City Waterways: Waves of Inspiration” is on display through June 29. This three-person exhibition investigates Alameda’s industrial landscape along the water’s edge. The featured works are by environmental painter Ginny Parsons, photographer Pons Maar, and industrial designer and artist Marc Ribaud. All three artists reside in Alameda.

Alameda Free Library (1550 Oak Street)
The library maintains a rich array of historical materials including books, pamphlets, and clippings relating to Alameda’s history — some more than 100-years-old. The Alameda Collection reflects the city’s historical and cultural development. When perusing the shelves, you’ll find non-fiction books based in Alameda, biographies of Alamedans, and materials written by Alamedans.

The Alameda Museum (2021 Alameda Ave)
Exhibits at The Alameda Museum celebrate and preserve the colorful past of this unique island city. You’ll find a number of maritime stories among the displays of early life in Alameda: history of Alaska Packers Association, a 1892 model of a tall-masted sailing vessel, a model of the ferryboat “Sacramento,” and more.

Island City Waterways is made possible by a number of Downtown Alameda businesses: 

OMM_Mason Management logoOMM, Inc / Mason Management (2514 Santa Clara Ave)

Alameda Natural Grocery (1650 Park Street)

Island Acupuncture (2424 Blanding Ave, Suite 102)

Julie’s Coffee & Tea Garden (1223 Park Street)

Alameda Collision Repair (1911 Park Street)

Alameda Island Brewing Company (1716 Park Street)Island Acupuncture, Alameda

Berg Injury Lawyers (2440 Santa Clara Ave)

Glass Tek (1726 Park Street)

Ole’s Waffle Shop (1507 Park Street)

Tucker’s Ice Cream (1349 Park Street)

Rich & Rose Krinks (Harbor Bay Realty, Broker and Associate Realtor)

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You’ll always find great food & drink establishments, charming shops, friendly services, and fun things to do in Downtown Alameda! To learn more about the businesses and events in Downtown Alameda, visit our new website: www.DowntownAlameda.com.

Downtown Alameda Business Association

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